1. 5 Ways to Have a Sustainable Holiday!

    The holiday season calls for spreading cheer through gifts, decorations and celebrations. Between mid-November and January, Canadians on average, produce over 545,000 tonnes of waste. Luckily, the majority of the holiday waste can be curbed through conscious-consuming, recycling and adequate disposal of unwanted goods. Here are five ways to have a sustainable holiday:

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  2. Opportunities and Challenges of Recovering and Recycling of Packaging

    As discussed in our previous blog post, product packaging is an integral element for businesses to easily transport, promote, and protect their products. Plastic, paperboard, metal, and glass are some of the most popular and widely used packaging materials today. These packaging materials are highly valuable and can be recycled post use through the various recycling streams such as blue box collection programs and deposit return systems across Canada and the United States. Despite its value and recyclability, an alarming rate of plastic, paperboard, metal and glass packaging are ending up in landfills. Industry leaders are working diligently to address this challenge and are exploring new opportunities to increase the diversion of packaging materials from the waste stream.

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  3. Greening your Packaging Design: Climate Change Adaptation

    As the realities of climate change sink in and natural resources diminish, it is clear that businesses in North America are embracing a culture that believes consuming smarter will lead to a sustainable and prosperous future. These shifts in consumer behaviour have provoked companies to shift their traditional business practices to a more sustainable model, one which embraces a “less is more” approach.

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  4. Bridging the Consumer Knowledge Gap

    Product packaging is an integral element for businesses to easily transport, promote and protect their products for consumer consumption and accounts for a substantial portion of the waste generated by Canadians. A recent study on municipal waste generation by the Conference Board of Canada shows that Canadians produce 777 kilograms of waste per person annually, significantly higher than the 587 kilogram average and more than double the 377 kilograms produced by consumers in Japan.

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  5. 5 Key Attributes to Achieve High Recycling Rates

    Companies across the globe are increasingly responding to the call for action in the sustainability arena. Many are making strides in reducing the environmental footprint of their own operations; however, minimizing the impact of products and product packaging on the environment at the post-consumer stage remains an ongoing challenge. A primary reason for this is that consumer behavior and the management of post-consumer waste are not under direct company control. Consequently, an increasing number of companies are seeking opportunities to strengthen municipal recycling programs and making sure they include their packaging among the list of accepted materials. A primary focus of such efforts is to promote single stream recycling via distribution of curbside recycling carts. While this is an important step, focusing on single stream curbside recycling infrastructure development alone, will have limited effectiveness.

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